Thursday, 13 December 2007

just call me Spangly Professor. Or something.

I have some kind of a job! woot, as I believe the kids say nowadays. (if not, don't disillusion me).

I am now adjunct faculty at an American University. Disconcertingly this mean that they call me a Professor. In the UK that means you are distinguished, important, and generally over 50. Apparently in the US system it simply means that you are teaching in a university?

All good news however. And more than makes up for the rather limp 1-1 with United last night.

Thanks to all of you for your kind thoughts and multifarious good luck messages.

15 comments:

JD said...

Congrats.

In the US "professor" means you stand in front of a classroom and know marginally more than most of your students. More seriously it usually implied some sort of PhD.

Paul de Man said...

Congratulations! You are deeply, deeply wonderful. You can now lead a life which is a wonderful cross of Miss Jean Brodie, The Talented Mr. Ripley, George Eliot and Henry James. (I.e, encourage kids to die for worthless causes, kill your best mate, marry a fanatic and then die of malaria.)

Great times!

de vertalerin said...

Well done, darling.

ursus arctos said...

Woo hoo!

Genuinely fabulous news.

Is your job title actually "professor", or is that just your honorific?

In the traditional US system, only tenured faculty have the "professor" title, but virtually everyone who isn't a graduate student is called "Professor X". The other job titles are usually "assistant professor", "associate professor",. "adjunct professor" and "lecturer".

martinobhoy said...

Congratulations gal, Professor Spangly has a certain ring to it.

I certainly wish there had been a Professor Spangly when I was at uni all those years ago. I might not have bombed out with a 2:2.

Juventino said...

It was the balena's culo, wasn't it???

Well done.

TrentToffee said...

Clever girl :0)

You do realise that you're going to have to tailor your dress sense accordingly. It could rather less Spangly and more tweedy.

Aussie Romanista said...

Let me be the first to launch a spitball at the blackboard from the back of the class... it wasn't me Miss, honest!
brava!

mattcr said...

ooh how exciting. congratulations!

Thomas said...

Congratulations. Ursus is right on the technicalities in the US, but even I'm called "professor" often even though I'm (a) only a lecturer; and (b) still a graduate student.

Spangly Princess said...

Thank you all for your kind words.

Professor is indeed merely a honorific but a mightily disconcerting one at that. When I was tutoring at Oxford it was as much as I could do to get my students to call me Ms Princess. And I am slowly acclimatising to be Dr Spangles now. But Professor is just freaky and weird.

Richard said...

Congrats, Spangles.

Anonymous said...

Congratulations darling!! I think Professor Spangly is a really worthwhile title.

Knew you would do it anyway - I keep trying to call you and it doesn't work, call me?

Meredith said...

So I was just browsing the music blogs looking for a CD for my friend's Christmas present. I was reading some guy's blog (http://halfhearteddude.blogspot.com) and one of his links jumped out at me...your blog! Talk about random. I think the universe was reminding me to come check how you were doing.

Congrats on the job - that's really fantastic! I got some good news recently myself: I've been invited to speak at a conference on Italian colonialism at Columbia next year.

Brian said...

Well done! But I think you're looking at this honorific problem the wrong way round. Don't be disconcerted by the adult gravity of it all---embrace your new authority! Practice your professorial glare and the next time anyone argues with you, knock them into orbit. A professorship is like the driver's license of the devastating eyebrow arch.